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Green Protein? Getting Protein From Plants Instead Of Meat Could Extend Your Life.

Green Protein? Getting Protein From Plants Instead Of Meat Could Extend Your Life. New study tells veggie lovers to eat their share and meat lovers not to despair. The amount, as well as the source, of protein you consume may affect your lifespan, according to a research study recently published in JAMA Internal Medicine. Conducted […]

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New study tells veggie lovers to eat their share and meat lovers not to despair.

The amount, as well as the source, of protein you consume may affect your lifespan, according to a research study recently published in JAMA Internal Medicine. Conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital, the new analysis found that people who consumed a large amounts of animal protein had a higher-than-average risk of perishing over the next few decades, especially if those individuals favored processed red meat as opposed to fish or poultry. Conversely, individuals who consumed more plant-based protein had a lower-than-average risk of death.

The new research incorporated data from two long-term studies, which monitored more than 170,000 total participants collectively. These studies’ participants were tracked for 26 to 30 years and responded to survey questionnaires about their health and eating habits every few years. On average, the test subjects received approximately 14% of their daily calories from animal protein and about 4% from plant-based protein. During the course of the study, more than 36,000 of the participants died.

After an adjustment of the results to account for lifestyle and other risk factors, researchers discovered that individuals who consumed the most animal protein —designated as any type of meat, eggs, or dairy — had a slightly increased risk of death. Individual who consumed less animal protein and ingested more protein from plant-based sources — such as breads, cereals, beans, nuts, pastas, and legumes —were the least likely to perish during the study.

Yet, the results of the new should not cause meat lovers to completely despair. The increased risk of death only applied to individuals who possessed at least one “unhealthy lifestyle” factor, such as being a heavy drinker, a smoker, overweight, obese, or a non-exerciser. For participants in the study who lived overall healthy lifestyles, the connection evaporated.

The study authors suspect that, in addition to lifestyle factors, the specific types of meat consumed also played a role.

“While we expected we might find the associations to be weaker in the healthy lifestyle group, we did not expect them to completely disappear,” said Mingyang Song, MD, a research fellow in the Massachusetts General Hospital Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit and Division of Gastroenterology, in a press release. “But when we looked deeper into the data, we found that — at similar levels of animal protein intake — those in the unhealthy lifestyle group consumed more red meats, eggs, and high-fat dairy, while the healthy lifestyle group consumed more fish and poultry.”

Actually, when researchers reclassified the study results into specific types of animal protein, they discovered that the connection between animal protein and increased risk of death applied primarily to individuals who consumed lots of processed and unprocessed red meats (including beef and pork), and not to poultry or fish.

Although this constitutes the largest study to examine the effects of different types of protein, its findings aren’t especially surprising. For a long time, experts have recommended plant-based proteins, poultry, and fish over red meat, which tends to be high in saturated fat and cholesterol. Health contributing nutrition editor Cynthia Sass, RD, notes that individuals who ingest less meat tend to weigh less and have lower rates of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Also, it’s not necessary to be a card-carrying vegetarian to embrace veggie-friendly habits, she explained in a post on Health.com last year. Eating more protein-packed pulses (peas, beans and lentils) can also offer benefits.

In that regard, this latest research study adds additional weight to what Sass and other nutrition experts have preached for years.

“Our findings suggest that people should consider eating more plant proteins than animal proteins,” said Dr. Song. “And when they do choose among sources of animal protein, fish and chicken are probably better choices.”

 
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Choosing Between Covered and Uncovered RV Storage in Greencastle, Indiana

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When it comes to storing your RV, choosing between covered and uncovered options can be a daunting task. Each has its benefits, and the best choice depends on your specific needs and circumstances. Here’s a listicle to help you weigh the pros and cons of each option in Greencastle, Indiana.

1. Protection from the Elements

Covered Storage:

  • Pros:
  • Shields your RV from direct sunlight, rain, snow, and hail.
  • Reduces the risk of UV damage to the exterior and interior.
  • Protects against tree sap, bird droppings, and other debris.
  • Cons:
  • May be more expensive due to the added protection.
  • Availability can be limited, especially during peak seasons.

Uncovered Storage:

  • Pros:
  • Generally more affordable than covered storage.
  • Easier to find available spots.
  • Cons:
  • Offers no protection from weather elements.
  • Increased exposure to potential damage from sun, rain, and snow.

2. Cost Considerations

Covered Storage:

  • Pros:
  • While more expensive, it can save money in the long run by preventing costly repairs from weather damage.
  • Cons:
  • Higher monthly or annual fees compared to uncovered storage.

Uncovered Storage:

  • Pros:
  • Lower cost makes it more budget-friendly.
  • Cons:
  • Potential for higher maintenance costs due to exposure to the elements.

3. Security

Covered Storage:

  • Pros:
  • Often includes additional security features like gated access, surveillance cameras, and lighting.
  • Less visible to passersby, reducing the risk of theft or vandalism.
  • Cons:
  • Security features may vary depending on the facility.

Uncovered Storage:

  • Pros:
  • Some facilities still offer good security measures such as fencing and surveillance.
  • Cons:
  • RVs are more exposed, which might attract unwanted attention.

4. Convenience and Accessibility

Covered Storage:

  • Pros:
  • May offer easy access with drive-up options.
  • Often provides amenities like cleaning stations and electricity hookups.
  • Cons:
  • Limited space can sometimes make maneuvering larger RVs more challenging.

Uncovered Storage:

  • Pros:
  • Typically offers more space, making it easier to park and retrieve your RV.
  • Cons:
  • Fewer facilities with amenities like electrical hookups or cleaning areas.

5. Climate Impact

Covered Storage:

  • Pros:
  • Ideal for Greencastle’s varied climate, providing consistent protection year-round.
  • Cons:
  • Humidity and temperature variations can still affect the RV, but to a lesser degree.

Uncovered Storage:

  • Pros:
  • Suitable for short-term storage during mild weather.
  • Cons:
  • Long-term exposure to Greencastle’s summer heat or winter cold can lead to deterioration.

Conclusion

Ultimately, the choice between covered and uncovered RV storage in Greencastle, Indiana, hinges on your priorities—be it cost, convenience, or protection. Assess your needs and budget, as well as the conditions your RV will face throughout the year. If you’re looking for peace of mind and long-term preservation of your RV, covered storage might be the better option. For those on a tighter budget or storing their RV for a short period, uncovered storage offers a suitable alternative.

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To Keep or To Sell Your Diamond: How to Make a Decision

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Diamonds may be forever, but that doesn’t mean they always need to stay with you. Whether you’ve inherited a family heirloom or own a diamond you no longer wear, you might be wondering if now is the right time to part ways. Here’s a quick list to guide you through the decision-making process.

1. Evaluate the Emotional Value

Keep: If the diamond holds significant sentimental value, like being passed down through generations, it might be worth keeping.

Sell: If the emotional attachment has diminished or it carries memories you’d rather forget, selling could be a freeing choice.

2. Assess Financial Needs

Keep: If you’re financially stable and don’t need the extra cash, holding onto your diamond could be a viable option.

Sell: However, if you’re facing financial challenges or have pressing expenses, selling the diamond can provide much-needed funds.

3. Consider Market Value

Keep: If the market for diamonds is currently down, waiting for a better time to sell might be wise.

Sell: Conversely, if the market value is high, you might want to take advantage of it and sell your diamond for a good price.

4. Think About Future Plans

Keep: If you see yourself or a loved one wearing the diamond in the future, it might be worth keeping.

Sell: If it’s simply collecting dust, selling it could open up opportunities to invest in something more meaningful or useful.

5. Get a Professional Appraisal

Keep: Knowing the exact value of your diamond can help you decide if it’s worth holding onto for its potential to appreciate over time.

Sell: An appraisal will also provide you with the necessary information to get a fair price if you decide to sell.

6. Look at Alternative Uses

Keep: Consider repurposing the diamond into a new piece of jewelry that you might wear more often.

Sell: If repurposing doesn’t appeal to you, selling remains a straightforward option.

7. Evaluate Storage and Security

Keep: If you have a secure place to store the diamond and are not worried about potential theft or loss, keeping it is feasible.

Sell: If secure storage is a concern, selling could alleviate the stress of safeguarding a valuable item.

8. Reflect on Personal Preferences

Keep: If you genuinely love the diamond and see it as a timeless piece in your collection, keep it.

Sell: If your taste has changed and the diamond no longer suits your style, selling it can help you move on and possibly fund something you truly love.

Conclusion

Deciding whether to keep or sell your diamond is a deeply personal choice that depends on various factors, from emotional connection to financial needs. Weighing these considerations carefully will help you make the best decision for your circumstances. If you need further assistance, consider consulting with a professional jeweler or financial advisor to guide you through the process.

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Everything You Need to Know about Insurance in a Car Accident

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Navigating the aftermath of a car accident can be daunting, particularly when dealing with insurance. Here’s a comprehensive list of everything you need to know to make the process smoother and ensure you’re well-prepared.

1. Understanding Your Coverage

Before an accident occurs, it’s crucial to understand what your insurance policy covers. Generally, car insurance policies include:

  • Liability Coverage: Covers damages to other people’s property and injuries you’re responsible for.
  • Collision Coverage: Pays for damage to your own car.
  • Comprehensive Coverage: Covers non-collision-related damages, like theft or natural disasters.
  • Personal Injury Protection (PIP): Covers medical expenses for you and your passengers, regardless of fault. Legal representation is also a great thing to consider regardless of your PIP coverage.

2. Immediate Steps After an Accident

After ensuring everyone’s safety, take these steps to streamline the insurance process:

  • Document the Scene: Take photos of the damage, the scene, and any injuries.
  • Exchange Information: Share insurance and contact details with the other driver(s).
  • File a Police Report: This document will be critical for your insurance claim.
  • Notify Your Insurance Company: Report the accident as soon as possible.

3. Filing a Claim

To file a claim, you’ll typically need:

  • Your Policy Number: Have this handy when contacting your insurer.
  • Details of the Accident: Include date, time, location, and a description.
  • Police Report: This adds credibility to your claim.
  • Witness Information (if any): Statements can support your account of the accident.

4. Dealing with Adjusters

Insurance adjusters assess the damage and determine the payout. Here’s how to handle them:

  • Be Honest: Provide accurate information about the accident.
  • Document Everything: Keep records of all communications.
  • Understand the Offer: Don’t rush to accept the first offer if it seems too low.

5. Rental Car Coverage

If your car is undrivable, check if your policy includes rental car reimbursement. This can cover the cost of a rental while your vehicle is being repaired.

6. Handling Disputes

If you disagree with the insurance company’s decision:

  • Review Your Policy: Ensure you understand your coverage.
  • Provide Additional Evidence: Submit any new information that supports your claim.
  • Consider Mediation: Sometimes, a neutral third party can help resolve disputes.

7. Preventing Future Accidents

While insurance helps post-accident, prevention is key:

  • Maintain Your Vehicle: Regular check-ups can prevent malfunctions.
  • Drive Defensively: Always be aware of your surroundings and anticipate other drivers’ actions.
  • Stay Educated: Refresh your knowledge of traffic laws and safe driving practices.

Navigating insurance after a car accident doesn’t have to be overwhelming. By understanding your coverage, knowing the steps to take, and how to handle the claims process, you can ensure a smoother experience during a stressful time. Stay safe and drive smart!

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